SADIE'S DOG PLACE

SNIFFING OUT INFO AND IDEAS

SNIFFING OUT DOG HEALTH  AND SAFETY

                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

How old is your best friend?
Your 3-year-old dog is 21 years old in human years, right? Not according to experts. The general consensus is that dogs mature faster than humans, reaching the equivalent of 21 years in only two, and then aging slows down to more like four human years per year. "Dog Whisperer" Cesar Milanís site recommends this way to calculate your dogís human-age equivalent: Subtract two from the age, multiply that by four and add 21.

Your Dog's First-Aid Kit

Since you never know when an accident will happen, keeping a pet emergency kit at your home is a good idea. A smaller kit could be used in the car.

You can put a first aid kit together yourself and buy the items separately, or buy one ready-made.

If you make one yourself, use a small plastic tub with a tight fitting lid to store the following items:

Important Phone Numbers
Veterinary clinic phone number and directions to the clinic
Emergency clinic phone number and directions
Poison control center phone numbers

Equipment and Supplies
Muzzle, or roll of gauze for making a muzzle
Magnifying glass
Scissors
Tweezers
Nail clippers and metal nail file
Styptic powder or sticks, Kwik Stop, or cornstarch
Penlight
Nylon slip leash
Eye dropper or oral syringe
Cotton swabs
Cotton balls
Clean towels - cloth and paper
Rectal thermometer
Lubricant such as mineral oil or KY Jelly (without spermicide)
Disposable gloves
Syringes of various sizes
Needle-nose pliers or hemostats
Grease-cutting dish soap
Bitter Apple or other product to discourage licking
Pet carrier
Towel or blanket to use as a stretcher, another to keep your dog warm during transport (some pharmacies and camping outlets carry a thermal blanket)
Cold packs and heat packs (wrap in towel before using)
Stethoscope
Bandaging Materials
Square gauze of various sizes - some sterile
Non-stick pads
First aid tape - both paper (easily comes off of skin) and adhesive types
Bandage rolls - gauze and Vetwrap
Band-Aids (for humans)

Nutritional Support
Rehydrating solution such as Gatorade or Pedialyte
Nutritional supplement such as Nutri-Cal, Vitacal, or Nutristat
High sugar source: Karo syrup

Medicines*
Wound disinfectant such as Betadine or Nolvasan
Triple antibiotic ointment for skin
Antibiotic ophthalmic ointment for eyes, e.g., Terramycin
Eye wash solution
Sterile saline
Antidiarrheal medicine such as Pet Pectate
Buffered or canine aspirin
Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) for allergic reactions
Cortisone spray or cream, such as Itch Stop
Ear cleaning solution
Hydrogen peroxide (used to make a dog vomit)
Activated charcoal to absorb ingested poisons (consult your veterinarian before using)

*Watch the expiration dates on any medication, and replace as needed.

Basic tips for handling an injured pet

If your pet is injured, it could be in pain and is also most likely scared and confused. You need to be careful to avoid getting hurt, bitten or scratched.

  • Never assume that even the gentlest pet will not bite or scratch if injured. Pain and fear can make animals unpredictable or even dangerous.
  • Don't attempt to hug an injured pet, and always keep your face away from its mouth. Although this may be your first impulse to comfort your pet, it might only scare the animal more or cause them pain.
  • Perform any examination slowly and gently. Stop if your animal becomes more agitated.
  • Call your veterinarian or an emergency veterinary clinic before you move your pet so they can be ready for you when you arrive.
  • If necessary and if your pet is not vomiting, place a muzzle on the pet to reduce the chances you'll be bitten.
    • Dogs may be muzzled with towels, stockings or gauze rolls.
    • Cats and other small animals may be wrapped in a towel to restrain them, but make sure your pet is not wrapped in the towel too tightly and its nose is uncovered so it can breathe.
    NEVER muzzle your pet if it is vomiting.
  • If possible, try to stabilize injuries before moving an injured animal by splinting or bandaging them.
  • While transporting your injured pet, keep it confined in a small area to reduce the risk of additional injury. Pet carriers work well, or you can use a box or other container (but make sure your pet has enough air). For larger dogs, you can use a board, toboggan/sled, door, throw rug, blanket or something similar to act as a stretcher.
  • You should always keep your pet's medical records in a safe, easily accessible place. Bring these with you when you take your dog for emergency treatment.

BASIC PET FIRST AID

Seizures

  • Keep your pet away from any objects (including furniture) that might hurt it. Do not try to restrain the pet.
  • Time the seizure (they usually last 2-3 minutes).
  • After the seizure has stopped, keep your pet as warm and quiet as possible and contact your veterinarian.

Fractures

  • Muzzle your pet.
  • Gently lay your pet on a flat surface for support.
  • While transporting your injured pet to a veterinarian, use a stretcher (you can use a board or other firm surface as a stretcher, or use a throw rug or blanket as a sling). If possible, secure the pet to the stretcher (make sure you don't put pressure on the injured area or the animal's chest) for transport—this may be as simple as wrapping a blanket around them.
  • You can attempt to set the fracture with a homemade splint, but remember that a badly-placed splint may cause more harm than good. If in doubt, it is always best to leave the bandaging and splinting to a veterinarian.

Bleeding (external)

  • Muzzle your pet.
  • Press a clean, thick gauze pad over the wound, and keep pressure over the wound with your hand until the blood starts clotting. This will often take several minutes for the clot to be strong enough to stop the bleeding. Instead of checking it every few seconds to see if it has clotted, hold pressure on it for a minimum of 3 minutes and then check it.
  • If bleeding is severe and on the legs, apply a tourniquet (using an elastic band or gauze) between the wound and the body, and apply a bandage and pressure over the wound. Loosen the tourniquet for 20 seconds every 15-20 minutes. Severe bleeding can quickly be life-threatening—get your animal to a veterinarian immediately if this occurs.

Bleeding (internal)

  • Symptoms: bleeding from nose, mouth, rectum, coughing up blood, blood in urine, pale gums, collapse, weak and rapid pulse.
  • Keep animal as warm and quiet as possible and transport immediately to a veterinarian.

Burns

  • Chemical
    • Muzzle the animal.
    • Flush burn immediately with large quantities of water.
  • Severe
    • Muzzle the animal.
    • Quickly apply ice water compress to burned area.

Choking

  • Symptoms: difficulty breathing, excessive pawing at the mouth, choking sounds when breathing or coughing, blue-tinged lips/tongue.
  • Use caution – a choking pet is more likely to bite in its panic.
  • If the pet can still breathe, keep it calm and get it to a veterinarian.
  • Look into the pet's mouth to see if a foreign object is visible. If you see an object, gently try to remove it with pliers or tweezers, but be careful not to push the object further down the throat. Don't spend a lot of time trying to remove it if it's not easy to reach—don't delay, and get your pet to a veterinarian immediately.
  • If you can't remove the object or your pet collapses, place both hands on the side of your pet's rib cage and apply firm quick pressure, or lay your pet on its side and strike the rib cage firmly with the palm of your hand 3-4 times. The idea behind this is to sharply push air out of their lungs and push the object out from behind. Keep repeating this until the object is dislodged or until you arrive at the veterinarian's office.

Heatstroke

  • Never leave your pet in the car on warm days. The temperature inside a car can rise very quickly to dangerous levels, even on milder days. Pets can succumb to heatstroke very easily and must be treated very quickly to give them the best chance of survival.
  • If you cannot immediately get your pet to a veterinarian, move it to a shaded area and out of direct sunlight.
  • Place a cool or cold, wet towel around its neck and head (do not cover your pet's eyes, nose or mouth).
  • Remove the towel, wring it out, and rewet it and rewrap it every few minutes as you cool the animal.
  • Pour or use a hose to keep water running over the animal's body (especially the abdomen and between the hind legs), and use your hands to massage its legs and sweep the water away as it absorbs the body heat.
  • Transport the pet to a veterinarian as soon as possible.

Shock

  • Symptoms: weak pulse, shallow breathing, nervousness, dazed eyes.
  • Usually follows severe injury or extreme fright.
  • Keep animal restrained, warm and quiet.
  • If animal is unconscious, keep head level with rest of body.
  • Transport the pet immediately to a veterinarian.

What to do if your pet is not breathing

  • Stay calm
  • If possible, have another person call the veterinarian while you help your pet.
  • Check to see if your pet is unconscious.
  • Open your pet's airway by gently grasping its tongue and pulling it forward (out of the mouth) until it is flat. Check the animal's throat to see if there are any foreign objects blocking the airway (see the section above on Choking
  • Perform rescue breathing by closing your pet's mouth (hold it closed with your hand) and breathing with your mouth directly into its nose until you see the animal's chest expand. Once the chest expands, continue the rescue breathing once every 4 or 5 seconds.

What to do if your pet has no heartbeat
Do not begin chest compressions until you've secured an airway and started rescue breathing (see the section above, What to do if your pet is not breathing.

  • Gently lay your pet on its right side on a firm surface. The heart is located in the lower half of the chest on the left side, just behind the elbow of the front left leg. Place one hand underneath the pet's chest for support and place the other hand over the heart.
  • For dogs, press down gently on your pet's heart about one inch for medium-sized dogs; press harder for larger animals and with less force for smaller animals.
  • To massage the hearts of cats and other tiny pets, cradle your hand around the animal's chest so your thumb is on the left side of the chest and your fingers are on the right side of the chest, and compress the chest by squeezing it between your thumb and fingers.
  • Press down 80-120 times per minute for larger animals and 100-150 times per minute for smaller ones.
  • Don't perform rescue breathing and chest compressions at the same exact time; alternate the chest compressions with the rescue breaths, or work as a team with another person so one person performs chest compressions for 4-5 seconds and stops long enough to allow the other person to give one rescue breath.
  • Continue until you can hear a heartbeat and your pet is breathing regularly, or you have arrived at the veterinary clinic and they can take over the resuscitation attempts.

Please remember that your pet's likelihood of surviving with resuscitation is very low. However, in an emergency it may give your pet its only chance.

DE-SKUNKING YOUR DOG

http://dan.drydog.com/patsyann/skunk.html

FULL RECIPE AND METHOD 

 

POOR "NOBODY" LEARNING ALL ABOUT THE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE SHAMPOO 

 P

 

CHOOSING A VET

We love our pets and want them to live long, healthy lives. One critical factor in their care is our relationship with a veterinarian that we trust. Just as you would in choosing a physician or dentist, you should do a bit of research to ensure that the vet you choose will be right for you and your dog. It is important to look for your vet before you bring home your dog or immediately thereafter. If you’ve moved to a new location, start looking for a new vet as soon as the boxes are unpacked. Develop your relationship before a problem arises. Your vet can be your best ally in your quest for a healthy life for your pet. Hopefully, this will be a long-term relationship and you should take care to ensure that you’ve chosen wisely.

 

Where to Start

Word of mouth is the best place to begin your search for the right vet. Ask people that you trust to recommend a good vet and to tell you why they chose him. Remember that their choice might not be yours, however. Some vets are better with one type of pet over another or some personalities over others. You want a vet whose personality works well with you and your dog. Some sources of recommendations might include the breeder of your dog or the local animal shelter, friends who have pets, or the trainer of your obedience class. Ask those that you know take good care of their pets and you will likely get the best recommendations. Your local phone book will have listings of area vets, but don’t make your choice based on convenience alone.

Narrowing Down the Choice

There are many facets to consider when choosing the right vet. Some obvious ones are location and office hours. You should not make your choice on location alone, but it is a consideration. You may love the great vet an hour away, but can you get to him soon enough in an emergency? Does the vet have office hours that work with your schedule? He may be wonderful, but it won’t be very convenient if you have to take time out of work to get to an appointment.

The First Visit

Once you have narrowed your choice to one or two, schedule an appointment with your top pick. When you arrive, take note of the condition of the office. It should look and smell reasonably clean. The size of the waiting room might be a consideration to you, as well. Are you and your dog comfortable waiting in a tight spot?

What to Ask

One of the first questions you should ask is whether this vet is available in emergencies, and if so, how can you contact him. If he is not available, does he have a suggestion for emergency care? It may be that your area has an emergency hospital nearby. It is critically important to have this information on hand in an emergency when minutes may count.

If you have an unusual breed or a dog that has an unusual condition, you should ask the vet if he is familiar with it. Ask him questions and be sure that you are comfortable with his response. Does he explain well or does he dismiss your questions?

Is there more than one vet working in the office? If there is more than one vet, do they have specialties? If so, can you request a certain vet? You may want to take the time to meet all the vets working in an office before you decide to see only one of them.

Does the vet provide any other services such as boarding or grooming? If these are services that you require, they may be important factors in your decision.

No one likes to discuss money up-front, but it may be an important consideration as well. Ask his fees for routine services like check-ups or vaccinations. Does he accept major credit cards? Will he allow you to make payments if your dog requires an expensive surgery or treatment?

 

What Else to Look For

The examination room should be clean and orderly. Has the table been wiped after the last patient left? The vet should perform a check up on your dog during the first visit. This should include feeling the dog over for suspicious lumps or bumps, looking in the eyes and ears, checking the teeth and checking the heart. He should also ask you questions about the dog’s general health. If he has never seen the dog before, he should ask for some of the dog’s medical history. Does the vet rush the check up (or not do it all)? Does he listen to you? Is he comfortable with your dog and does he seem to have a good rapport with the dog? Does your dog seem to like him or at least seem comfortable? Of course, some dogs are difficult at every vet visit. If your dog is one of these, is the vet able to handle him? An experienced vet can handle the most difficult dog with a minimum of stress for the dog.

Once you have chosen your vet, ensure that you and your dog visit him regularly. Keep him informed of any changes in your dog that concern you. Don’t be afraid to ask question and even get second opinions if the need arises. Take an active part in your dog’s health care and you will keep your friend with you for many years to come!

FOODS TO AVOID GIVING YOUR DOG !

Some foods which are edible for humans, and even other species of animals, can pose hazards for dogs
because of their different metabolism. Some may cause only mild digestive upsets, whereas, others can
cause severe illness, and even death. The following common food items should not be fed (intentionally
or unintentionally) to dogs. This list is, of course, incomplete because we can not possibly list everything your dog should not eat.

Items to avoid Reasons to avoid
Alcoholic beverages Can cause intoxication, coma, and death.
Baby food Can contain onion powder, which can be toxic to dogs. (Please see onion below.) Can also result in nutritional deficiencies, if fed in large amounts.
Bones from fish, poultry, or other meat sources Can cause obstruction or laceration of the digestive system.
Cat food Generally too high in protein and fats.
Chocolate, coffee, tea, and other caffeine Contain caffeine, theobromine, or theophylline, which can be toxic and affect the heart and nervous systems.
Citrus oil extracts Can cause vomiting.
Fat trimmings Can cause pancreatitis.
Grapes and raisins Contain an unknown toxin, which can damage the kidneys. There have been no problems associated with grape seed extract.
Hops Unknown compound causes panting, increased heart rate, elevated temperature, seizures, and death.
Human vitamin supplements containing iron Can damage the lining of the digestive system and be toxic to the other organs including the liver and kidneys.
Large amounts of liver Can cause Vitamin A toxicity, which affects muscles and bones.
Macadamia nuts Contain an unknown toxin, which can affect the digestive and nervous systems and muscle.
Marijuana Can depress the nervous system, cause vomiting, and changes in the heart rate.
Milk and other dairy products Some adult dogs and cats do not have sufficient amounts of the enzyme lactase, which breaks down the lactose in milk. This can result in diarrhea. Lactose-free milk products are available for pets.
Moldy or spoiled food, garbage Can contain multiple toxins causing vomiting and diarrhea and can also affect other organs.
Mushrooms Can contain toxins, which may affect multiple systems in the body, cause shock, and result in death.
Onions and garlic (raw, cooked, or powder) Contain sulfoxides and disulfides, which can damage red blood cells and cause anemia. Cats are more susceptible than dogs. Garlic is less toxic than onions.
Persimmons Seeds can cause intestinal obstruction and enteritis.
Pits from peaches and plums Can cause obstruction of the digestive tract.
Potato, rhubarb, and tomato leaves; potato and tomato stems Contain oxalates, which can affect the digestive, nervous, and urinary systems. This is more of a problem in livestock.
Raw eggs Contain an enzyme called avidin, which decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin). This can lead to skin and hair coat problems. Raw eggs may also contain Salmonella.
Raw fish Can result in a thiamine (a B vitamin) deficiency leading to loss of appetite, seizures, and in severe cases, death. More common if raw fish is fed regularly.
Salt If eaten in large quantities it may lead to electrolyte imbalances.
String Can become trapped in the digestive system; called a "string foreign body."
Sugary foods Can lead to obesity, dental problems, and possibly diabetes mellitus.
Table scraps (in large amounts) Table scraps are not nutritionally balanced. They should never be more than 10% of the diet. Fat should be trimmed from meat; bones should not be fed.
Tobacco Contains nicotine, which affects the digestive and nervous systems. Can result in rapid heart beat, collapse, coma, and death.
Yeast dough Can expand and produce gas in the digestive system, causing pain and possible rupture of the stomach or intestines.

DISEASES OF DOGS

LIST OF DOG DISEASES @ GO PETS AMERICA

A COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF DISEASES AND COMMON DRUGS FOR DOGS. A GOOD LIST TO HAVE AFTER A VISIT TO THE VET.




For Your Dog's Safety

http://www.ruffrider.com/shop/product/2.html


You put on your seatbelt everytime (or you should)
Please do it for your pet too



Pedigree Dogs Exposed

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbvv0vBf7t8  ORIGINALLY BROADCAST ON CBC'S PASSIONATE EYE

What inbreeding does to the health of the dog. The truth about the future of our dog breeds.

Multipart documentary. Check this out before you get your next dog.

The British Kennel Club has revised some of their rules after this documentary and the Canadian Kennel Club is now reviewing their policies. 

 Its a step in the right direction but we can do more. Talk with local breeders to find out their ideas of the "perfect dog". Even better refer them to this documentary.